Chapter 16


The large corner, grocery, pub and wholesale spirit store was rebuilt by Mooney Bros. in 1900 and flourished under the management of Hugh Savage, Pat O'Hare and James Connolly. When Mooneys dissolved in 1936 the man in charge at that time, James Connolly, carried on the business employing as manager Mick Lamb; and as his travelling agent, Tom McAleenan who was also Connolly's brother-in-law. When James Connolly died in 1956 the place closed for years. About the late 1950's the bar only was rented by a family of three brothers, Duggans, from Annsborough. This lasted a year or two and they gave up in the early 1960's. The whole place lay empty till the mid 1970's before being bought by Malachy Magorrian who had plenty of ideas as to how to turn it into money. He renovated the inside, repainted the outside, and opened the bar under the name "The Pheasant Inn"; employing a manager to operate that end of the business. The main building was turned into an amusement centre, and a lorry purchased to commence a cut price milk delivery service from the rear stores. The pub proved a useless effort so Malachy closed it and transferred the licence to the Oak Grill. The town was too small to support an amusement centre so that closed as well. The people who were to supply him with milk sold out and that also was a non starter. Malachy then converted the shop area into office and for the last five years those have been rented by the Gateway Building Society.

On the Newcastle Road between the Presbyterian Church and the exit from the Football field stands a raised terrace of two storey house. Behind the one nearest the field there is a large yard, once the nerve centre of MacAleenans, the main building contractors in the area, between 1890 and 1923. MacAleenans, as the firm was known because of the large family participation, built Mooney Bros. about the 1900's. As a temporary premises for Mooneys they erected a large shed in the upper square thus giving that shop the name of the store and it was known as that for many a year. When Mooneys was completed the mountain of stones left on the street created a problem which was solved by "Big Jim The Boss MacAleenan" who used the lot to build the fourteen houses, known as the New Row, for his work force. Although all the tenants of those little houses had bought them outright by 1986 some were stilll ownedby Tom McAleenan in the 1970's. MacAleenan Builders stopped operating in 1923 on the completion of James McKenny's corner pub and house - their last business venture.

 The New Row shortly after it was built.

The New Row shortly after it was built.